18 November 2019

Counselor’s Corner: It’s Good to Talk

Published by Stamford American School Hong Kong
Renovation-and-refit-projects

“Our young people today face constant stressors and challenges – happening in their own lives and in the world around them.” - Professor Alberto Trimboli, President of World Federation for Mental Health

Students are much more stressed out than we sometimes realize. In a recent study, The American Psychological Association stated that 20% of children report that “they worry a great deal or a lot,” yet only 3% of parents rate their child’s stress as extreme. 

With each generation, the world is becoming more open to conversations about mental health. Mental health professionals, international agencies, and even celebrities are working hard to fight the negative stigma that has for so long surrounded the topic of mental health. Let’s talk is an international campaign that aims to spark conversations about mental health. “It’s ok to not feel ok. Speak up. Let’s Talk.https://www.letstalkcampaign.com https://www.letstalkcampaign.com

Talking Tips

“Encouraging children to understand and be open about their feelings can give them the skills to cope with the ups and downs that life will throw at them as they grow up. It is important that our children understand that emotions are normal and that they have the confidence to ask for help if they are struggling.” - HRH The Duchess of Cambridge, Patron of the Anna Freud Centre

Learning how to communicate feelings is imperative to the social and emotional development of children. Children and young adults should be encouraged to talk about how they feel and it is important that the adults in their life are listening. The Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families has been developing mental health care for over 60 years. Check out some of their tips below for how you can make talking about mental health a priority in your family. If you need support, reach out to your school counselors!

Image: Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families

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